Coming into Rhythm with Your Natural Workflows

One of the beauties of the internet age is the inherent flexibility in the way we work. Unlike the older industrial systems (of which our industrial education system is bred), which required a certain consistency in time (when you're using a series of wheels and gears, each cog must fit seamlessly together), our new world is one of fluidity. The digital world functions whether anyone's at the factory at 7am sharp or not, and the…

Whiteboarding as a Structure for Thinking

Over the past few months, I've become an adamant proponent of whiteboarding -- as a mode of organization, but more importantly, as a structure for thinking. Every time I have a creative problem I'm solving, or a project I'm structuring, I take it to the whiteboard and I lay out a roadmap for the solution. I use it for work on a regular basis (at this point, I've commandeered half the whiteboards in the office…

Ask Interesting People About Their Content Consumption

"What content would you recommend to me?" has become one of my favorite questions. The above form is its simplest generalization; there's ample room to make it more concrete. "What content on startups?" "What content on the topic of history?" Interesting people become interesting, in large part, because of two things: The things they do The things they consume The ideas they surround themselves with are the things that shape the way their minds work,…

Stop Treating Your Goals as Checklists and Turn them into a Lifestyle

When we set goals, our inclination is to add their pursuit as items on a to-do list. It's our base assumption about goals -- that they're things we "have to do." We add their pursuit to our days, tacking them on before and after work, before and after dinner, before we go to bed at night and directly after we rise in the morning. We add them as items on a checklist -- and maybe…

How to Read a Book (for the sake of getting smarter)

There are two things to collect when reading a book: the insights of the author (things you want to remember) and the insights the book illicits for yourself. Sometimes the most valuable things about a book are the things you learn. Other times, it's the rabbit trails that spin off of it, and the things it makes you think about. In reading a book, your task is to capture both. 1. Highlight, underline, and take…

Advice to My 19-Year-Old Self

Someone recently asked me, "What advice would you go back and give your 19-year-old self?" The question was posed by one of my friends. She's 19 (hence the question) and a total badass -- way cooler than I was at 19. She's already over a year into her startup career, already establishing herself as a respected professional in her network. She's intelligent and articulate and indomitable. That's why she asks questions like this. Because she's…

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